Cecil Rhodes set out to achieve immortality by leaving a 4,000-year legacy. His “cult” is still evidenced by 30 biographies, eight novels, six plays and countless films and documentaries. Barely 120 years after his death, however, this legacy is now crumbling.

As the greatest individual symbol of British imperialism, Rhodes’s memorials clearly need no longer occupy prominent places, as these constitute a permanent assault on the descendants of his black victims. However, it is also critical that Rhodes’s monuments not be totally erased. History should be preserved through memorials in museums and theme parks that properly contextualise the atrocities of such imperial figures...

BL Premium

This article is reserved for our subscribers.

A subscription helps you enjoy the best of our business content every day along with benefits such as articles from our international business news partners; ProfileData financial data; and digital access to the Sunday Times and Sunday Times Daily.

Already subscribed? Simply sign in below.



Questions or problems? Email helpdesk@businesslive.co.za or call 0860 52 52 00. Got a subscription voucher? Redeem it now