Pro-Trump protesters storm into the US Capitol during clashes with police, during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 US presidential election results by the US Congress, in Washington, US, on January 6, 2021. Picture: REUTERS/SHANNON STAPLETON
Pro-Trump protesters storm into the US Capitol during clashes with police, during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 US presidential election results by the US Congress, in Washington, US, on January 6, 2021. Picture: REUTERS/SHANNON STAPLETON

Commentators bewail Donald Trump’s failed coup d’etat in Washington, yet such mayhem is what the US has imposed upon the rest of the world for decades. The US has instigated and funded an estimated 100 cases of “regime change” — from Iran in 1953 and Chile in 1973 to its present failed efforts to overthrow the governments of Venezuela and Iran. Another example is British “arse-licking” subservience in the travesty of the Julian Assange extradition case for exposing US war crimes.

Thankfully, reckless American militarist obsessions to impose US hegemony on the planet are at last collapsing. The end of financial dominance of the US dollar will follow. Central banks, including the SA Reserve Bank, are investigating digital currencies as alternatives to the dollar. The price of bitcoin has soared.

The 2016 presidential election was a choice between a war criminal (Hillary Clinton) and a lunatic. The lunatic, it was rightly predicted, would “bust the system” rather than massage it. An estimated 1,000 US military bases around the world (including 35 in Africa) intended to enforce US military and financial hegemony are a menace to global peace and security. The system doesn’t care that the US has lost every war since 1945 (most notably Vietnam and Afghanistan) as long as the profits flow to what Dwight Eisenhower in 1961 described as the corruption of the “congressional-military-industrial complex”.  

The US war business is a prime example of grand corruption/state capture. Devastation has been inflicted upon millions of refugees and displaced people since 9/11 when Iraq was falsely accused of having “weapons of mass destruction”.   About 40%-45% of global corruption relates to the arms trade, of which the US is by far the dominant player. The lunatic was arguably the better choice to illustrate how war-obsessed America has gone mad. The US and the world now has a unique opportunity to construct new financial and political structures fit for purpose for the post-Covid 21st century.

The world (but overwhelmingly the US and Nato) annually spends $2-trillion on war preparations. A fraction of that money could productively fund an array of global priorities from climate change and renewable energy, public health, education and poverty alleviation. About 200-million people face starvation in 2021 because of Covid, plus the Anglo-American obsessions of inflicting “forever wars” to plunder oil and other natural resources in the so-called “third world”.  

Grand corruption is an unmitigated evil. It intentionally deprives the poor of any prospects to be free from fear and want, and to seek a better life. We in SA know the consequences of the corruption the arms deal  and ANC have wreaked on our country. It is time for SA to take the global lead in designating “grand corruption/state capture” as a crime against humanity in terms of international law. As a start, albeit amid US and British objections, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons will become international law on January 22.

Will president Joe Biden have the guts to sign and ratify the treaty as symbolic of US commitment to a new era? The “chickens have come home” … and the end is nigh for US Empire Inc.

Terry Crawford-Browne
World Beyond War SA  

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