Mmusi Maimane during a sitting in parliament. PICTURE: ESA ALEXANDER / SUNDAY TIMES
Mmusi Maimane during a sitting in parliament. PICTURE: ESA ALEXANDER / SUNDAY TIMES

I am deeply indebted to Frans Cronjé of the Institute of Race Relations for pointing out last week that the DA has not in fact ditched its BEE position. The DA itself then said that its upcoming manifesto will include a new and better form of BEE than that currently on offer from the ANC.

I find the DA’s use of race as a proxy for poverty to be sophistic and designed to keep people like me voting for them in the belief that their BEE policy will actually improve the situation, as argued by Douglas Gibson in his letter “DA Claims To Tackle Poverty” (February 19).

The evidence on offer in SA regarding BEE, as well as what I have gleaned from other countries, strongly suggests that no form of black empowerment, irrespective of how much lipstick is applied, will actually “tackle” poverty. Instead, it will and already has made it worse.

As a businessperson who has helped to create a number of productive jobs, I am no longer willing to vote for a party that essentially views me as a second-class citizen, in much the same way as you cannot expect turkeys to vote for Christmas.

Nor am I willing to watch my friends’ children pack their bags for foreign parts, unable any longer to endure a racially charged atmosphere that makes them feel somehow guilty for being “coloured”, “white” or “Indian”.    

James Cunningham
Camps Bay