The Valhalla was announced in 2019 to slot in under Aston Martin’s flagship supercar, the Valkyrie. Picture: SUPPLIED
The Valhalla was announced in 2019 to slot in under Aston Martin’s flagship supercar, the Valkyrie. Picture: SUPPLIED

Production of Aston Martin’s Valhalla supercar has been pushed back by a year to 2023, and it may get a Mercedes-AMG engine instead of an in-house-built V6 as previously planned.

New Aston Martin CEO Tobias Moers, who previously headed up Mercedes-AMG, said in an investor presentation last week that his team is reassessing the design of the mid-engined car, including the power train.

Initially the car was to have been powered by an Aston Martin turbocharged V6 engine combined with a hybrid battery-electric system, but last year Moers hinted that that the two-seater coupe may be shifted along by a Benz power train instead.

With the October 2020 announcement that Mercedes-Benz would increase its stake in the British firm from 2.6% to 20% by 2023, this has opened up opportunities for even more technology sharing between the two firms, especially hybrid and electric power trains.

Mercedes-AMG already supplies Aston Martin with V8 and V12 engines for the Vantage and DB11. Mercedes will also supply Formula One power units to the new Aston Martin F1 team this year.

“We will have the Valhalla with us in the second half of 2023,” Moers said, and a new version of the concept will be shown to buyers within the next four months, with “everything being a reasonable cost situation”.

The Valhalla was announced in 2019 to slot in under Aston Martin’s flagship supercar, the Valkyrie, which will be launched this year in a limited run of 175 units. The Valhalla, of which 500 units will be built, will be less powerful than the Valkyrie but is also being made with full carbon fibre construction and a F1-inspired power train.

Moers also confirmed that Mercedes-Benz plug-in hybrid technology with “reasonable electric range” will reach Aston’s DBX, the company’s first SUV, by 2024 with additional derivatives of the SUV also planned.

Aston Martin also says 90% of its portfolio should be electrified by 2030.

The financially troubled British sports car maker was rescued in 2020 by Canadian billionaire Lawrence Stroll. The fashion mogul injected cash, replaced Andy Palmer with Moers as CEO, and enhanced ties with Mercedes-Benz.

After making losses in the last two years, the company expects improved fortunes in 2021. Driven by demand for its DBX, Aston Martin plans to produce 6,000 vehicles this year, up from just 3,394 in 2020.

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