Carjackings have increased to 18,162 cases from 16,026 the year before, a rise of 13.3%. Picture: DENIS DROPPA
Carjackings have increased to 18,162 cases from 16,026 the year before, a rise of 13.3%. Picture: DENIS DROPPA

You are far more likely to be hijacked in a hatchback or sedan than an SUV, according to the latest annual crime statistics released by the South African Police Service (SAPS). Trucks and motorcycles are also lower on the list of hijackers’ targets.

The annual crime statistics announced by police minister Bheki Cele on July 31 revealed that 5,245 sedans or hatchbacks had been hijacked around the country between April 2019 and March 2020, with bakkies the second most hijacked type of vehicle at 2,200 cases, followed by taxis on 945 cases and trucks on 161 cases.

In the same period, 57 SUVs and 47 motorcycles were hijacked.

Carjackings increased to 18,162 cases from 16,026 the year before, a rise of 13.3%. Over a 10-year period, annual incidences of this crime have steadily increased from 10,541 to the present 18,162 cases.

Cele said in Friday’s briefing that “operational interventions” have been deployed accordingly to address the growing increase in carjackings. 

Most carjackings in the last year took place in Gauteng with 9,025 cases, followed by KwaZulu-Natal (3,041), Western Cape (2,760), Eastern Cape (1,111), Mpumalanga (999), North West (493), Limpopo (458) and Free State (241). The Northern Cape was the province with the least number of carjackings at 34 cases.

Motorists were most likely to be hijacked on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays between 6pm and 9pm, and on a Friday or Saturday night between 9pm and midnight.

The least likely times were between 3am and 6am on weekdays, and between 6am and 9am on weekends.

While carjackings were up, the theft of cars and motorcycles has shown a downward trend over the last ten years, decreasing from 64,162 cases in 2010/2011 to the present 46,921 cases.

There was a 13.7% hike in incidences of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs last year, from 82,912 to 94,273 cases, and a rise from 66,645 a decade ago.

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