Rear-wheel steering enhances urban and dynamic handling. Picture: NEWSPRESS UK
Rear-wheel steering enhances urban and dynamic handling. Picture: NEWSPRESS UK

Our Renault Megane GT seems to be finding its mojo, as it were, thanks to it now showing incremental fuel consumption improvements.

We are averaging 8.7l/ 100km without changing driving style, although the figure is still on the high side for its engine capacity.

Granted, we have kept this French hatch within the confines of the urban environment and a long road trip is in order. That undertaking will firstly prove whether or not the model’s GT suffix is apt in this context and, second, how can the fuel consumption figure further improve.

The model’s rear-wheel steer mechanism is easily one of its headlining features. as no other vehicle in the segment offers this setup. How it works is that the rear wheels, at slow speeds, steer in the opposite direction of the front wheels, thereby virtually reducing the vehicle’s wheelbase and making parking and three-point turns a breeze. At slightly higher speeds, the rear wheels steer in the direction of the front ones, which results in sharper turn-in. It was a system I first encountered in the Renault Laguna coupe back in 2010, and it is now used in more sophisticated sports cars such as the Porsche 911 GT3 and the Ferrari 812.

The infotainment system is good once you get accustomed to it. However, trying to get into submenus such as navigation maps or music folders while on the move does mean taking your eyes off the road.

The infotainment system is still taking some getting used to. Picture: NEWSPRES SUK
The infotainment system is still taking some getting used to. Picture: NEWSPRES SUK

Then there is the adjustment of the climate control, particularly the fan speed, which requires you to swipe upwards to access the menu, which is not ideal while on the move. I get the idea behind having a clean, minimalist look, but shortcut fan speed buttons integrated into the existing temperature knobs would be a great idea.

I also like the cool, blue-to-violet mood lighting on the inside of doors and centre tunnel, which adds a premium feel to the cabin. This can be changed to either yellow or red via the infotainment screen.

The gearbox does not do first-gear peak traffic crawling speeds particularly well.

Also, the normal setting on the RS driving mode is not the best setting for the gearbox for some reason as it seems to take much longer to swap gears and is jerky.

The comfort setting, instead, seems to be the most enjoyable for everyday driving.

I am still not a fan of the company’s steering column-mounted remote controls for the radio. Yes, we have gotten used to them over the years, but it is archaic and it would be great to have these located on the steering wheel instead.

Quibbles aside, the vehicle has not given us any issues this month. It continues to be a consummate daily commuter with form-hugging, comfortable seats and a sporty yet forgiving suspension with a penchant for hugging corners should the mood take you.

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