Donald Trump. Picture: REUTERS
Donald Trump. Picture: REUTERS

Seven decades ago a racist immigrant from Austria, driven by a belief in white supremacy, decided to put Germany first and to rid it of people who look and believe differently. He rebuilt the German economy, largely on the back of the weapons industry amid war talk.

He invented the strategy of repeating a lie so often that people start believing it. It took many people, including other world leaders, years to realise the danger he posed to world peace.

Seven decades later, a man from an immigrant family, driven by racist and white supremacist sentiments, decided to put his country first and to rid it of people who look and believe differently. He seems to have economic success, boosted by a booming weapons industry amid war talk.

He seems to have perfected Hitler’s strategy of repeating a lie until most believe it. His racist slurs revived the racism that has been simmering under the surface and it burst into the open, not only in his own country but much wider afield.

What is happening in the US now has already started spreading — to Europe especially — on a populist wave, but thankfully a wave of opposition is developing, even preventing President Donald Trump from visiting the UK. However, there is still a degree of complacency about the danger he poses, with many asking what is wrong with putting your country first. What they are missing is that it is also driven by racist and white supremacist sentiments, like seven decades ago.

Dawie Jacobs
Sterrewag

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