Former COO of corruption-accused facilities management company Bosasa, Angelo Agrizzi prepares to give testimony at the Commission into State Capture in Parktown, Johannesburg. Picture: Alaister Russell/The Sunday Times
Former COO of corruption-accused facilities management company Bosasa, Angelo Agrizzi prepares to give testimony at the Commission into State Capture in Parktown, Johannesburg. Picture: Alaister Russell/The Sunday Times

Bosasa gave a former union boss grocery parcels amounting to R15‚000 a month for him pressuring petrochemical giant Sasol to give the company a contract‚ the state-capture inquiry heard on Wednesday.

Former Bosasa COO Angelo Agrizzi testified that he went to a meeting with the general secretary of the Chemical‚ Energy‚ Paper‚ Printing‚ Wood and Allied Workers Union (Ceppawu) Simon Mofokeng‚ at the behest of Bosasa CEO Gavin Watson to “sort out Sasol”.

The commission‚ headed by deputy chief justice Raymond Zondo‚ heard how Mofokeng allegedly gave Bosasa inside information on amending their pricing structure in 1999, in order to get a certain contract.

Agrizzi said it was usual practice for Bosasa — now called African Global Operations but then named Dyambu — to put pressure on the union to create a work stoppage in an effort to force management to award tenders to the company.

He said that after Mofokeng gave them inside information‚ they successfully won the contract. Agrizzi said that after this‚ he was made to sign off on gifts for Mofokeng, which included meat parcels‚ groceries and soft drinks.

“Occasionally‚ when Mofokeng felt ‘done in’ or he needed extra meat‚ he would call Gavin Watson who would then call me‚” Agrizzi said.

Mofokeng was sacked from Ceppawu in 2017 after he faced an internal revolt. In 2013‚ he was implicated in a shady empowerment deal with Sasol worth up to R60m a year.

Agrizzi’s testimony is part of broader evidence he has presented to the Zondo commission into state capture, on how Bosasa would pay bribes to politically connected people in lieu of government tenders and contracts.

His testimony is expected to implicate a number of well-connected people and seeks to show how Bosasa allegedly corruptly received business from the state for two decades.

The hearing continues.