Acting Police Commissioner Lieutenant-General Khomotso Phahlane. Picture: SIMPHIWE NKWALI/SUNDAY TIMES
Acting Police Commissioner Lieutenant-General Khomotso Phahlane. Picture: SIMPHIWE NKWALI/SUNDAY TIMES

Acting National Police Commissioner Khomotso Phahlane has dismissed investigations into his property as a distraction, saying he takes umbrage at being probed by a private citizen.

"I don’t take kindly to being investigated by a private person, more so one that is facing serious criminal charges themselves. If building my house was a corrupt practice, why do we all have houses?

"I have yet to see the details of this R8m house so I can sell it. I’m sure by the end of the financial year it will be R14m and give me an R11m profit," he said.

Forensic investigator Paul O’Sullivan opened a case in January 2016, raising red flags that the bond Phahlane had registered was lower than the value of the house.

The Independent Police Investigative Directorate (Ipid) began investigations into Phahlane’s property.

The house was reportedly built in Sable Hills Waterfront Estate, north of Pretoria, in 2011 and 2012. Sources told News24 then that Phahlane began contacting witnesses in the Ipid investigation after he became aware of it.

The police watchdog is also investigating allegations that Phahlane stuffed R700,000 in cash into plastic bags to make payments to a contractor.

During a briefing in Pretoria on Thursday alongside Phahlane, Police Minister Nkosinathi Nhleko lashed out at continuing disagreements among the leaders of police agencies which are playing out in full view of the country.

Phahlane has said he will co-operate with the Ipid investigation even though he deems the complaint a witch-hunt.

Nhleko implied that Ipid boss Robert McBride was lobbying support from the public through the media in an effort to avoid being held accountable for his handling of the rendition case that got him suspended.

"If certain things have broken in law, what use is it of me to come before journalists and proclaim my innocence?

"We must learn to respect process. By doing so, we will then be upholding the penance of the rule of law.

"If a matter is before the courts, do not speak on behalf of the courts," he said.

Nhleko, Phahlane, Hawks boss Berning Ntlemeza and McBride are engaged in a dispute that has spilled into the public domain.

Least pleased with the internal fracas at the police and its agencies is Parliament’s police committee. It said it was eagerly awaiting direction from President Jacob Zuma on the Claassen Commission into Commissioner Riah Phiyega’s fitness to hold office.

Phahlane has said he will co-operate with the Ipid investigation even though he deems the complaint a witch-hunt.

Committee chairman Francois Beukman said they would look at the report once Zuma had formally responded to it.

"In terms of the South African Police Service Act, it is referred to us. The president must make a final decision first.

"The Claassen Commission said the commissioner should go, but Zuma is waiting for representations from Phiyega. Once that is done, we will look at the matter," said Beukman.

He said stability in leadership positions at police agencies would also be a high priority.

Beukman said the public spats among heads of police agencies undermined public confidence in law enforcement.

"That should end. From the portfolio committee, we want professional institutions the public can have confidence in. The institutions will have to sort that out.

"We can’t have ongoing commentary on ongoing investigations being sent to the NPA [National Prosecuting Authority]. It’s not on," said Beukman.

Loading...

Loading...

Please login or register to comment.