The special Misano Blue paint, exclusively available in the M2 CS, is one of the defining features of the limited-run model. Picture: SUPPLIED
The special Misano Blue paint, exclusively available in the M2 CS, is one of the defining features of the limited-run model. Picture: SUPPLIED

Fanatics are apprehensive that the BMW M2’s eventual replacement will be shaped from foreign matter such as a hot 2.0l four-cylinder and front-wheel led xDrive system.

But before that there’s the new BMW M2 CS, the last of its kind, as described by Gennaro Bonafede, head of BMW M & Driving Experience in SA.

The vehicle that is being marketed in a limited range of 30 cars, of which 20 were auctioned in one night at Kyalami last week, offers the classic BMW format of six-cylinder in front, manual or automatic transmission in the middle, and pure rear-wheel drive.

The M2 CS gets aesthetic and mechanical differentiators such as black or matt gold lightweight 19-inch wheels shod with Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 tyres, a new front splitter, bigger boot lid spoiler and a bonnet-lid, roof and rear diffuser crafted in carbon fibre.

Inside there are M Sport seats from the BMW M4 CS, M Sport steering wheel with Alcantara covering and a red centre marker as an option. The motorsport armaments include adaptive M suspension with Comfort, Sport and Sport+ modes, M Sport brakes with red-painted calipers while some of the units are fitted with the optional M Carbon ceramic brakes.

A dual-branch exhaust system with four stainless steel tailpipes bearing the M logo offers a raspier bleat above standard and Competition models.

The other notable thing the M2 CS receives is a 3.0l six-cylinder that churns out 331kW. That’s 29kW more than in the BMW M2 Competition. Torque output stays at 550Nm.

Acceleration from 0-100km/h is in 4.0 sec for models fitted with a seven-speed double-clutch auto and 4.2 sec for six-speed manual models. Top speed is 280km/h in both.

What’s the new M2 CS like to drive? In a word, fast!

Pull-away is crisp, with little to no telltale waywardness typical of a powerful, compact rear-wheel drive car.

The interior is typical of BMW CS models and retains daily usability through comfort features while aligning with its motorsports purposes. Picture: SUPPLIED
The interior is typical of BMW CS models and retains daily usability through comfort features while aligning with its motorsports purposes. Picture: SUPPLIED

If fitted with ceramic brakes it allows for deeper retardation into bends while the rear end of the CS feels tenaciously glued to the tarmac. This also means early throttle out of corners, and the electronic active M Differential does a fair apportionment of torque between the pair of driven wheels.

The evidence of a club sport groove is all there but the M2 CS feels capable of more. There’s definitely room for an even more pared back version with greater power, less weight and a roll cage. For now, all 30 numbered M2 CS are spoken for in SA and they will be the rare possession of a few.

The standard list price was R1,615,744 but some of the highly sought number plaques were reportedly auctioned above the R2m mark.

Would you like to comment on this article or view other readers' comments?
Register (it’s quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.