Unpopular: Demonstrators protest against British Prime Minister Boris Johnson outside Downing Street. Picture: AFP/NurPhoto/WIktor Szymanowicz
Unpopular: Demonstrators protest against British Prime Minister Boris Johnson outside Downing Street. Picture: AFP/NurPhoto/WIktor Szymanowicz

A week used to be a long time in politics. Now a single day can seem like an entire career in that filthy game of treachery and delusion.

On Monday, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson provoked outrage among some of his citizens by threatening to call a snap election if rebel Tories pressed on with their plan to put to parliament a bill that would — if it won — prevent a no-deal Brexit.

By lunchtime on Tuesday, his threat seemed as empty as a Yorkshire colliery (remember them?) as the rebels apparently refused to be cowed.

A tweet from the BBC’s Laura Kuenssberg noted that someone at Johnson’s Tory meeting told her it had been "crap".

Given the various official and often contradictory mutterings on Brexit over the past few weeks, this comes as no surprise.

Westminster looks increasingly like an episode of the original British-made TV series House of Cards, which starred Ian Richardson as Francis Urquhart, a Machiavellian and murderous Conservative Party chief whip who, in his own words, likes to "put a bit of stick about".

Johnson, no stranger to theatrics, seems to be wanting to do the same. The trouble for him is that this is not television but formerly Great Britain staring into the abyss of irrelevance.

Watched from afar, British politics looks like a chaotic circus with the clowns and ringmasters guzzling hallucinogenics. Pushback from the other performers is guaranteed.

Let’s see what tomorrow brings. It could be a new prime minister.