SARS commissioner Tom Moyane. Picture: FREDDY MAVUNDA
SARS commissioner Tom Moyane. Picture: FREDDY MAVUNDA

Tom Moyane: As commissioner of Sars, Moyane has been instrumental in crippling the revenue service, leading to low tax morale and a high deficit. Last year, finance minister Malusi Gigaba estimated the tax revenue deficit at R50.8bn in 2017-2018 — the highest since the 2009 recession. There has also been a major brain drain at Sars, with 506 employees leaving in the first 10 months of 2017.

Shaun Abrahams: As national director of public prosecutions, Abrahams has the task of deciding whether Zuma should face a host of corruption charges. He has been accused of bias and of shielding Zuma. For the past decade the NPA has been seen as politically captured. A court has overturned Abrahams’s appointment and found Zuma too conflicted to appoint an NPA head. This is being taken on appeal.

Mosebenzi Zwane: Regulatory uncertainty and lack of confidence in the mining industry, one of the country’s key areas, has worsened under Zwane as mineral resources minister — especially after the suspension of the third version of the mining charter which he gazetted last June. Zwane is also regarded as a Gupta stooge and has been fingered in the Vrede dairy farm financial scandal in the Free State.

Bathabile Dlamini: The social development minister and ANC Women’s League president is one of Zuma’s staunchest supporters and plunged the social security agency Sassa into a grants crisis. She faces an inquiry into whether she should be held personally liable for the fiasco when Sassa was unable to take over the payment of grants.

Berning Ntlemeza: A high court found Ntlemeza, whom Zuma appointed as head of the Hawks, to be dishonest and biased. Ntlemeza played a role in criminal charges being laid against former finance minister Pravin Gordhan, which were subsequently withdrawn. Also despite numerous charges being laid regarding state capture, he did nothing about it. He was eventually removed from his post through the courts.

Riah Phiyega: Phiyega was the new police commissioner when 34 striking mine workers were gunned down by police in Marikana in 2012. The Farlam commission of inquiry recommended she face an inquiry into her fitness to hold office. She was suspended in 2016.

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