PUSHING TIN: The price of tin for delivery in three months on the London Metal Exchange has been driven up more than 70% from its 2020 low to almost $23,400 a ton, thanks partly to the work-from- home trend. Picture: Bloomberg/Simon Dawson
PUSHING TIN: The price of tin for delivery in three months on the London Metal Exchange has been driven up more than 70% from its 2020 low to almost $23,400 a ton, thanks partly to the work-from- home trend. Picture: Bloomberg/Simon Dawson

Hot commodity

Tin prices have soared to a seven-year high after a manufacturing-driven buying frenzy that has drained physical stocks of the commodity. The metal, usually associated with cans, has become a key material for the global electronics industry, given its use in circuit boards and wiring. The shift to working from home has boosted demand for computers and other devices, while China has also been stockpiling the metal.

Financial Times

Bull stampede

Investors poured a record $58bn into stock funds last week while slashing their cash holdings. Technology-focused funds were at the centre of the surge, with net inflows reaching a new high of $5.4bn, according to data collated by Bank of America. The US had the lion’s share of overall stock inflows, at $36.3bn. Investors also piled $13.1bn into global bond funds while pulling $10.6bn from cash. The data underlines how low interest rates and expectations for a big growth rebound this year have whetted investors’ appetite.

Financial Times

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