Women in the waves. PICTURE: MICHAEL PINYANA
Women in the waves. PICTURE: MICHAEL PINYANA

Springster, a mobile-first global brand created by international nonprofit organisation Girl Effect, is focused on building media that help girls make positive choices and changes in their lives. The brand connects girls in countries as diverse as Kenya, Ghana and Indonesia with free online content that is designed to help them navigate the complexities associated with growing up. Available in 15 countries, Springster’s content was accessed by more than 2-million girls in the past year.

The platform provides a space for girls to engage with topics like puberty, education, money management and relationships, with content focused on issues such as confidence, health, education, economic readiness and nutrition.

Local agency HelloFCB+ was involved with Springster’s campaign, called Girl Possible, from late 2019 to April 2020, creating content focused on encouraging girls to think about their aspirations for their future and their economic goals.

Content ranged from encouraging GIFS to informative posts that included career advice, financial tips and “how-to’s”, in four languages. Behind the scenes the brand worked with women across the respective countries, both to ensure the content was rooted in girls’ realities and to bring the campaign to life.

The aim of the campaign, explains Laura Baines, senior programmes manager at Girl Effect, was to get girls talking about their hopes and dreams both online and offline, taking inspiration from each other and providing tangible stories of success with practical advice. “We wanted to defy the statistics we found in our formative research that showed that girls were simply not talking about their career aspirations and goals.” 

The campaign elicited almost 40,000 video views and over 1.5-million engagements. During the three-month campaign period it shifted opinions of an estimated 18-000 users in SA alone about the importance of talking about goals.

‘We wanted to defy the statistics we found in our formative research that showed that girls were simply not talking about their career aspirations and goals.’

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