Natasha Marrian Financial Mail deputy editor & columnist

Jacob Zuma cut a lonely figure at the state capture commission of inquiry this week. He appeared haggard and drawn as he sat alone, peering over a mask at the protagonists in the proceedings unfolding before him. He was almost pitiful as he sat flanked by two empty chairs before deputy chief justice Raymond Zondo.His counsel, advocate Muzi Sikhakhane, was arguing for Zondo’s recusal as the chair of the commission.Zuma’s strategy in dealing with authority and accountability is well known by now.This week’s recusal application was no different — it was based on conspiracies, political innuendo and, not unsurprisingly, blatant lies.The wider intent was to collapse the commission — which the commission’s counsel, advocate Paul Pretorius, with Sikhakhane conceding the point, said would happen if Zondo did recuse himself.Zuma was always going to be a lose-lose situation for the commission — he was never going to try to address the voluminous evidence against him. Sikhakhane said as much —...

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