This file picture shows US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping leaving a business leaders event at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. Picture: Nicolas ASFOURI/AFP
This file picture shows US President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping leaving a business leaders event at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. Picture: Nicolas ASFOURI/AFP

Donald Trump didn’t get his wall, but he will get his trade war with China based on this week’s indictment against Huawei. The US government has charged the telecoms giant and its CFO, Meng Wanzhou, for conspiring to break sanctions with Iran and stealing robotic technology from the US division of T-Mobile.

Trump held his own country to ransom with a 35-day government shutdown that cost an estimated $11bn. Now he’s turned to his other favourite pastime, trolling China.

Having started a trade war last year, Trump and his securocrats want to prevent telecoms providers from using Huawei equipment, fearing they might be used to spy on Western powers. Huawei denies this, as it does claims that it is linked to the Chinese military.

Chinese and American officials are meeting in Washington this week to reach an agreement before the Trump administration levies another $200bn in tariffs on Chinese imports.

Some economists say the trade war does more to hurt US companies which, like most of the world, use cheap Chinese labour to make their products, or hope to sell them to China’s thriving middle class.

It’s not coincidental that this latest attack on Huawei comes as Trump attempts to deflect both his embarrassing climb-down over his wall-building election promise and the indictment of his political adviser, Roger Stone.

The justice department alleges Huawei reached its position as the largest telecommunications equipment maker using "lies and deceit" — coincidentally what many people say Trump used to win the White House.