Equites Property Fund’s Andrea Taverna-Turisan. Picture: Supplied
Equites Property Fund’s Andrea Taverna-Turisan. Picture: Supplied

What’s your one top tip for doing a deal?

Don’t try to be too clever, as that might chase the deal away.

What was your first job?

I was a media planner at an advertising agency.

How much was your first pay cheque, and how did you spend it?

£600 — and it all went towards rent.

What is the one investment you wish you had made, or made earlier?

I wish I had bought lots of Apple stock when Steve Jobs came back to the company.

What are you reading at the moment? What’s the one book everyone should read?

I am reading Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari at the moment. Everyone should read Nelson Mandela’s autobiography.

How would you fix Eskom?

I would employ a CEO with competence rather than political affiliation.

What is your biggest regret?

Andrea Taverna-Turisan, CEO of Equites Property Fund. Picture: Supplied
Andrea Taverna-Turisan, CEO of Equites Property Fund. Picture: Supplied

My biggest regret is that my brother died when he was only 17. I was 15 at the time.

What was your worst purchase?

A piece of land in Montague Gardens that I bought on auction. Luckily I was able to sell it again before the transfer went through.

Is there such a thing as "enough money", and if so, how much is it?

Yes, there is — but the quantum depends on which country you live in.

What do you consider the most overrated virtue?

Good looks.

What is something you would go back and tell your younger self that would impress him?

Trust yourself!

Was there ever a point at which you wanted to trade it all in for a different career? And if so, what would that career be?

I have had three career changes. I have always loved property, and even though it was a slow process to get here, that is my passion.

What’s the one thing you wish somebody had told you when you were starting out?

Never be scared to make a mistake.

If you were president, what would you change tomorrow?

I would employ people with business acumen rather than political affiliation to run state-owned enterprises.