Lesiba Mothata, executive chief economist at Alexander Forbes Investments. Picture: SUPPLIED
Lesiba Mothata, executive chief economist at Alexander Forbes Investments. Picture: SUPPLIED

If someone came to you tomorrow with R100m to invest in just one company, which would it be?

Danaher Corp, a US firm based in Washington, DC. In the past 30 years, its share price has increased 100-fold in value. It outperformed the market and its peers even during the 2008 global financial crisis. Its management has a unique strategy of turning businesses around and adding value in a diversified fashion.

What was your first job?

As a vacation student, I worked for an asset management firm called Prodigy, based at the Waterfront, Cape Town.

If you could fix one thing in SA today, what would it be?

The preoccupation with macroeconomics in finding economic solutions for SA is misplaced. Economic growth ought to be sought in the micro aspects of cities peripheral to the metropolitan areas.

What’s the best investment you’ve ever made?

As a youngster, shortly after completing my degree, in my first year of work, I purchased a house in the eastern suburbs — Kempton Park. I sold the property for 2½ times the initial value within five years, during the real estate boom in the early 2000s.

What’s your favourite song?

Dear Mama by Tupac Shakur. My favourite of all time.

On what occasion do you lie?

Never, really.

What is your greatest extravagance?

I have discovered wine. I tend to look for opportunities to make a collection of different ones.

What travel experience is on your bucket list?

Brazil. The soul and culture of cities like Rio de Janeiro are experiences to look forward to.

What’s the worst investment you’ve ever made?

Acquiring bonsai trees. They needed special attention and died shortly after purchase.

How much was your first pay cheque and what did you do with it?

It was R10,000. I gave 60% of it to my mother to install a new kitchen.

What was your last purchase?

A tailored suit. I need to increase my accumulation in this department.

Do you own bitcoin or any other cryptocurrencies? And why?

No. I tend to be more conservative when it comes to money matters. I do not like to jump on bandwagons or fads. I do, however, find the technology behind cryptocurrencies, blockchain, very useful and it will certainly define a lot of what gets done in the future. As for cryptocurrencies, I will leave it to the enthusiasts.

If you could turn back time, what would you change in your life?

Nothing really. I have grown to appreciate that all things work out for the good. Wisdom is found even in the deepest regrets and most painful moments.