Planning his departure: Jeremy Corbyn on his way to parliament. Picture: AFP/Tolga Akmen
Planning his departure: Jeremy Corbyn on his way to parliament. Picture: AFP/Tolga Akmen

The United Kingdom looks a little diminished this week. Not because its people have — for the second time in three years — given its ruling class a mandate to exit the best peace treaty Europe has ever enjoyed, but because of the palpable sense of exhaustion that hangs over the country, like smoke after the Great Fire of London.

No-one called the election like it happened. After all the gaffes, missteps and whiffs of scandal that seem to follow Boris Johnson around, it looked as if things could go either way. Sure, hell would freeze over before Labour sent the PM packing. But a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats and Scottish National Party? Anyone?

And then the drubbing. A landslide victory for the Tories after a day in which media outlets couldn’t help gushing about high voter turnouts across the land.

It looks like the people rushed to the polling stations with one outcome in mind — don’t let Jeremy Corbyn anywhere near Number 10.

Corbyn really has only himself to blame. The election was about Brexit and he refused to make a stand on either side of the ditch. Someone should have told him neutrality is for the Swiss.

Instead, he’s going to be remembered for winning, hands down, the biggest unpopularity contest in decades.

The ABC of British politics in recent weeks has been Anyone But Corbyn. But Johnson played a better game.

Now that the rebel Tory MPs have been sacked and a cabinet reshuffle is due, the new mantra, at least for now, is All Boris’s Chums.