A group of war veterans in Zimbabwe indicates where his followers will settle on Rockwell Farm, owned by farmer Andreo Malus, in March 2000. Picture: HOWARD BURDITT
A group of war veterans in Zimbabwe indicates where his followers will settle on Rockwell Farm, owned by farmer Andreo Malus, in March 2000. Picture: HOWARD BURDITT

1. Zimbabwe land offer

Foreign white farmers in Zimbabwe whose land was seized under Robert Mugabe can apply to get it back and will be offered land elsewhere if restitution proves impractical, Reuters reports. The government made the announcement this week, after agreeing last month to pay $3.5bn in compensation to local white farmers whose land was forcibly taken by the government.

In some instances, it could mean the government would "revoke the offer letters of resettled [black] farmers currently occupying those pieces of land and offer them alternative land elsewhere", the finance and agriculture ministers said in a joint statement.

2. Fed up with Covid curbs

The German government has labelled the scenes at a far-right protest on the steps of the Reichstag building, where the lower house of Germany’s parliament convenes, "shameful". Protesters attempted to storm the building during a mass rally against restrictions on gathering and movement aimed at curbing the spread of the coronavirus.

Some protesters carried the former imperial flag, which was used until the end of World War 1, which German leaders condemned as an attack on democracy. About 300 people were arrested in scuffles with police.

3. K-pop stardom

A Korean band has become the first K-pop act to top the Billboard Hot 100 singles charts in the US, with the release of its first English language single, Dynamite. The song hit 33.9-million US streams within the first week of its release. The band, BTS, had the biggest week for digital sales for any band in close to three years. The seven-member group debuted in 2013, bringing the Korean wave of music, pop culture and entertainment to global platforms. Even South Korean President Moon Jae-in weighed in, saying the band had achieved a "splendid feat".

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