What it means: It would appear that KPMG either was incompetent or negligent in not knowing what it should have reported to authorities, or it deliberately looked away. KPMG SA is trying everything to save itself in the wake of allegations surrounding work it did for the Gupta family and the SA Revenue Service (Sars) report on the "rogue unit", but the more damage control it tries to do, the deeper the hole it is digging for itself gets. The international auditing and accounting firm’s attempt at being "transparent" is just raising more questions which it cannot or will not answer. KPMG says it was an auditor for 33 Gupta companies until it dropped them in April 2016 citing "association risk". But it found nothing which required it to report to law-enforcement agencies, apparently.This is rather odd, as Judge Hans Fabricius, who dismissed an interim application by 20 Gupta companies to stop the Bank of Baroda from closing their accounts, said: "Could it be possible that the future, ...

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