×

We've got news for you.

Register on BusinessLIVE at no cost to receive newsletters, read exclusive articles & more.
Register now
Building resilience into our food systems is key to not only sustaining our current food supply but increasing it as our population expands. Picture: TimesLIVE/123RF/karandaev
Building resilience into our food systems is key to not only sustaining our current food supply but increasing it as our population expands. Picture: TimesLIVE/123RF/karandaev

In this issue of Agriculture we delve broadly into, among other themes, the effects of global warming, which can already be felt as drought and torrential rains alternate across SA, reducing yields and threatening food security.

Building resilience into our food systems is key to not only sustaining our current food supply but increasing it as our population expands. Part of this strategy of resilience is developing technologies that will not only ensure greater yields, but also reduce the inputs required to produce them.

Technology and food, however, represent a pairing often met with doubt by many consumers. Since the advent of genetically modified organisms, consumers have been wary of production systems that stray too far from the way our ancestors produced food. And while there have been many questionable alternatives to Mother Nature’s pantry staples — think margarine and artificial sweeteners — the world will need to start relying more on technology to get us through changing weather patterns and dwindling resources.

Fortunately, our food systems have never been under as much scrutiny as now, which means any new technologies face stringent testing before they are deemed safe.

 

Browse through the full magazine below (zoom in or go full screen for ease of reading):


subscribe