South Korea’s naval ships take part in a military drill for possible attack from North Korea in the water of the East Sea, South Korea, on September 5 2017. Picture: REUTERS
South Korea’s naval ships take part in a military drill for possible attack from North Korea in the water of the East Sea, South Korea, on September 5 2017. Picture: REUTERS

Vladivostok/Seoul — South Korean President Moon Jae-in told Russian leader Vladimir Putin on Wednesday that the situation on the Korean peninsula could become unpredictable if Pyongyang did not halt its "provocative actions" after its latest nuclear bomb test.

Putin and Moon met on the sidelines of an economic summit in the far eastern Russian city of Vladivostok, amid mounting international concern that their shared neighbour plans more weapons tests, possibly a long-range missile launch, ahead of a key anniversary at the weekend.

A top North Korean diplomat has warned that more "gift packages" to the US are being readied.

South Korea’s Unification Ministry said on Wednesday it was still expecting more activity from the North.

Moon, who came to power earlier this year advocating a policy of pursuing engagement with Pyongyang, has come under increasing pressure to take a harder line on North Korea.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who us to discuss North Korea with Moon and Putin in Vladivostok, said on Wednesday that he wanted the North to understand it had "no bright future" if it continued on its current path.

North Korea’s ambassador to the UN Han Tae Song attends the Conference on Disarmament at the UN in Geneva, Switzerland, on September 5 2017. Picture: REUTERS
North Korea’s ambassador to the UN Han Tae Song attends the Conference on Disarmament at the UN in Geneva, Switzerland, on September 5 2017. Picture: REUTERS

Moon said on Tuesday that the United Nations should consider tough new sanctions on North Korea, including halting oil shipments, after Sunday’s nuclear test.

However, Russia has reacted coolly to the prospect of more sanctions, with Putin saying on Tuesday it was a "road to nowhere".

Sanctions have so far done little to stop North Korea boosting its nuclear and missile capacity as it faces off with US President Donald Trump, who has vowed to stop Pyongyang from being able to hit the US mainland with a nuclear weapon.

The US ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, has accused North Korean leader Kim Jong-un of "begging for war" and urged the 15-member UN Security Council to impose the "strongest possible" sanctions to deter him and shut down his trading partners.

Han Tae Song, Pyongyang’s ambassador to the United Nations in Geneva, confirmed that North Korea had successfully conducted its sixth and largest nuclear bomb test on Sunday.

"The recent self-defence measures by my country, DPRK, are a gift package addressed to none other than the US," Han told a disarmament conference, using the acronym for North Korea’s formal name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

"The US will receive more ‘gift packages’ ... as long as it relies on reckless provocations and futile attempts to put pressure on the DPRK," he said, without elaborating.

Sunday’s test of what North Korea said was an advanced hydrogen bomb was its largest by far.

Japan upgraded its assessment of the North Korean test to 160 kilotons from 120 kilotons after the magnitude of the earthquake it generated was revised to 6.1.

"Calculating based on this number, the estimated yield was 160 kilotons," Defence Minister Itsunori Onodera told reporters.

"We estimate this was far bigger than previous nuclear tests."

Satellite imagery appeared to show the blast caused numerous landslides at North Korea’s Punggye-ri test site, according to 38 North, a Washington-based North Korean monitoring project.

South Korean officials said they continued to monitor for radioactive fallout from the test, and for signs of preparations for more activity as they pushed for a stronger international response.

More sanctions?

Diplomats have said the Security Council could consider banning North Korean textile exports, barring its airline and stopping supplies of oil to the government and military.

Other measures could include preventing North Koreans from working abroad and adding top officials to a blacklist aimed at imposing asset freezes and travel bans.

Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May agreed in a telephone call on Tuesday that China, the North’s main ally and trading partner, must do more to persuade North Korea to cease its missile tests, a spokesman for May said.

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull also spoke with Trump and reiterated calls for China to use its leverage to bring North Korea in line.

China and Russia have advocated a "freeze for freeze" plan, where the US and Seoul halt major military drills in exchange for North Korea halting its weapons programmes, but neither side is willing to budge.

North Korea says it needs to develop its weapons to defend itself against what it sees as US aggression.

Reuters

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