The US has welcomed Chinese concessions since the two declared a trade-war truce in early December, but trade experts and people familiar with negotiations say Beijing needs to do far more to meet US demands for long-term change in how China does business. US President Donald Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, agreed on December 1 in Buenos Aires to stop escalating tit-for-tat tariffs that have disrupted the flow of hundreds of billions of dollars of goods between the world’s two biggest economies. Since then, Beijing has resumed buying US soya beans, the single-largest agricultural export between the two countries. China has also cut tariffs on imports of cars from the US, dialled back on an industrial development plan known as “Made in China 2025”, and told its state refiners to buy more US oil. Trump took those as signs that “China wants to make a big and very comprehensive deal”. But they only start to bring Beijing and Washington back to their pre-trade-war status q...

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