Ethiopian government soldiers and prisoners of war in military uniforms walk through the streets of Mekelle, the capital of Tigray region, Ethiopia, July 2 2021. Picture: REUTERS
Ethiopian government soldiers and prisoners of war in military uniforms walk through the streets of Mekelle, the capital of Tigray region, Ethiopia, July 2 2021. Picture: REUTERS

Addis Ababa — An air strike hit the capital of Tigray region in northern Ethiopia on Wednesday morning, regionally controlled television said, reporting the second attack on the city of Mekelle this week.

Tigrai Television, controlled by the region’s Tigrayan People's Liberation Front (TPLF), reported the attack targeted the city centre.

It posted photographs of what appeared to be plumes of billowing smoke, but it was not immediately possible for Reuters to geolocate the photographs. The TV station said in a statement on Facebook that the strike was at 7.24am GMT.

Ethiopia’s government spokesperson, Legesse Tulu, did not immediately answer a phone call requesting comment on the reported strike. It was not immediately possible to reach the spokesperson for the TPLF.

The two sides have been fighting a war for almost a year that has killed thousands of people and displaced more than 2-million.

A humanitarian source in Mekelle told Reuters the strike was in an area of the city called 05 Kebelle — an area near the a cement factory on the city's outskirts.

The report of a strike comes two days after two air strikes hit the city. Rebellious Tigrayan forces accused the Ethiopian government of launching the strikes. Though a government official initially denied any strikes, state-run media later reported the air force conducted an attack.

The news follows intensified fighting in two other Ethiopian regions, where the central government’s military is trying to recover territory taken by the TPLF, which recaptured Mekelle and most of the rest of Tigray several months ago.

“The federal air strikes on Mekelle appear to be part of efforts to weaken Tigray’s armed resistance, which has recently made further gains in eastern Amhara region, with fighting ongoing in some areas,” said Will Davison, a senior analyst on Ethiopia at the Brussels-based International Crisis Group, a think-tank.

“Along with superior manpower, control of the skies is one of the few remaining areas of military advantage for the federal government,” Davison said.

Reuters

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