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Juba, South Sudan — Margret has decided that South Sudan is not a place to raise children, but she is changing this for future generations. That’s why, 10 years ago, the mother of two joined the country’s 400 to 500 de-miners, digging up remnants of past and present wars — bombs, unexploded ordnances and landmines. She’s one of a growing number of women to take up the risky business, most of them mothers wanting to provide safety for their families. "It’s my way of contributing and making this country better," she says. "I sent my children to Uganda, but I want them to come back one day. It’s a sacrifice for me, but a gain for those returning when the war is over." Landmines have a long history in South Sudan, the world’s youngest nation, which won independence from Sudan in 2011 after a long and violent liberation struggle. After just two years, a political squabble escalated into renewed civil war in late 2013, fracturing the new nation along ethnic lines. More than 4-million mine...

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