Naledi Pandor (left) and Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma (centre) and Cyril Ramaphosa are sworn in at the National Assembly in Cape Town, May 22 2019. Picture: GCIS
Naledi Pandor (left) and Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma (centre) and Cyril Ramaphosa are sworn in at the National Assembly in Cape Town, May 22 2019. Picture: GCIS

All eyes will be on President Cyril Ramaphosa as the country awaits the announcement of his new cabinet following his inauguration at the weekend.

Ramaphosa has promised a reconfigured and smaller cabinet, and has vowed to get rid of unsavoury characters and those implicated in state capture and corruption.

The lead-up to Ramaphosa’s election and inauguration on Saturday was characterised by drama and intrigue after his deputy, David Mabuza, postponed his swearing-in as an MP, so he could clear his name after being flagged by the ANC’s integrity commission.

The Sunday Times reported  that Mabuza met the integrity commission on Friday night. It did not give details of the meeting but said the commission will report back to the ANC head office on its deliberations with him and 21 party leaders it flagged before the elections.

If the commission clears him, Mabuza could still be sworn in as an MP and could retain his position if this is done before the cabinet’s announcement.

Mabuza’s decision not to take part in the swearing-in process has opened up speculation on who the country’s deputy president will be, with former cabinet ministers Naledi Pandor and Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma being mentioned as possible contenders.

The constitution prescribes that the president select the deputy president from among the members of the National Assembly.  Ramaphosa has the space to select no more than two cabinet ministers from outside parliament.

After the Cabinet announcement, the ANC’s national executive committee (NEC) will meet ahead of the party’s NEC lekgotla scheduled to take place at the weekend. The lekgotla will set the political tone for Ramaphosa’s government over the next five years.

The DA will continue dealing with its own internal machinations ahead of the party’s federal council early in June at which the different legislatures and members of the National Assembly will continue voting on who will represent the different bodies in the party’s highest decision-making body between federal congresses. 

It is a standard process in the party following general elections.

The state capture commission of inquiry chaired by deputy chief justice Raymond Zondo will continue hearing evidence on what transpired at Transnet as part of the state capture project. The commission is expected to hear the testimony of former Transnet employee Gerhard van der Westhuizen on Monday.