Tell us your story: Yunus Carrim, chairman of the standing committee on finance, will preside over several important hearings this week, including a presentation by Capitec. Picture: SUPPLIED
Tell us your story: Yunus Carrim, chairman of the standing committee on finance, will preside over several important hearings this week, including a presentation by Capitec. Picture: SUPPLIED

Former South African Revenue Service (SARS) second-in-command Jonas Makwakwa may have resigned, but Parliament’s standing committee on finance is not done and will on Tuesday receive a report back on how the tax authority had cleared him of any wrongdoing in relation to suspicious transactions detected by the Financial Intelligence Centre.

In what marks a big week for the committee, Capitec executives will give their side of the story in response to a damning report by short seller Viceroy into the bank’s affairs. The committee will also delve into the circumstances that led to VBS Mutual Bank being placed under curatorship. All three matters — the Makwakwa saga, Capitec and VBS — will be dealt with on Tuesday.

Committee chairman Yunus Carrim said: "A key concern has been the unacceptable way in which SARS has managed this."

In addition, the committee would continue engagements with SARS to consider whether there was a need to amend legislation or regulations to reduce the prospects of a similar controversy emerging in the future. It also believed that the conduct of law firm Hogan Lovells in the matter must be investigated further.

It remains to be seen whether the state will foot former president Jacob Zuma’s legal bill when he stands trial, after the National Prosecuting Authority’s announcement on Friday that Zuma had a case to answer on 16 criminal charges.

DA leader Mmusi Maimane described the decision as a "victory for all", but his party will also "fight to ensure the public do not have to carry the costs of Zuma’s defence".

President Cyril Ramaphosa, in response to a question from EFF leader Julius Malema, revealed in Parliament that the government had contributed R15.3m towards Zuma’s legal costs since 2006.

Ramaphosa could not answer Malema’s question on what law or policy had been applied when coming to the decision to fund Zuma’s legal battles. The president said he would provide more details within a week.

Deputy President David Mabuza, the new leader of government business, will on Tuesday field questions from MPs for the first time since he took office in February.

The SABC will on Tuesday brief MPs about its 2017-18 second-quarter reports.

Various events are lined up to mark Human Rights Day on Wednesday.

phakathib@businesslive.co.za