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President Cyril Ramaphosa. Picture: FRENNIE SHIVAMBU/GALLO IMAGES
President Cyril Ramaphosa. Picture: FRENNIE SHIVAMBU/GALLO IMAGES

President Cyril Ramaphosa’s tone in referring to taxpayers was of scorn and disrespect. His assertion that taxpayers were monopolising good health and leaving others unattended fails to recognise that taxpayers do not set policy in SA — his party does.

Taxpayers are simply hard workers trying to build their dreams for their families. They toil daily to earn their salary. Thirty percent of that salary is taken away by Sars, with threats of imprisonment, fines or loss of whatever they have built up in possessions if they don’t share their salary.

There are a multitude of laws designed to keep a tight, aggressive fist around the taxpayer’s throat ... the same taxpayer that pays for all the free electricity, water, education, healthcare, RDP houses, subsidised transport, childcare grants, Covid-19 relief cash and many other benefits non-taxpayers get.

It is not fun to pay tax. After sacrificing a third of one’s salary so that strangers, who never thank you, can have a better life, to then be told you are being selfish and that, not just 30%, but a likely 51%, will be taken from your salary to give to non-contributors is a slap in the face.

National Health Insurance is a political play designed to win votes for ANC, but in that victory SA will lose the taxpayers.

It is not as difficult as people think for a country to turn into Zimbabwe 2.0.

As the health sector that has enabled taxpayers to be healthy enough to work and sustain SA shuts down with both taxpayer and doctors packing and leaving, maybe then South Africans will learn the lesson, that you don’t abuse the goose that lays golden eggs.

Ask Zimbabweans who abused their farmers and lost both farmers and food production capacity.

You’ve been warned.

John Ngonono
Via email

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