subscribe Support our award-winning journalism. The Premium package (digital only) is R30 for the first month and thereafter you pay R129 p/m now ad-free for all subscribers.
Subscribe now
Russia's President Vladimir Putin. File photo: REUTERS
Russia's President Vladimir Putin. File photo: REUTERS

The sudden death of Russian lawyer and activist Alexei Navalny reminds me of Russian and US foreign policy: “one death is a tragedy, 30,000 deaths are statistics” (“Navalny’s mother says Russia plans to bury her son’s body in secret,” February 22).

Russia is a land of intrigue and has been for centuries, from the House of Romanov to the czars, the Bolsheviks and today’s elitists. The Kremlin is a dangerous and foreboding place — leaders vanish mysteriously, journalists are killed under the cloak of secrecy, business people fall off buildings in controlled suicides and enemies perish in mysterious air crashes.

The head of the Wagner Group, Yevgeny Prigozhin, was eliminated in a well-planned and co-ordinated air crash. Boris Nemtsov, deputy prime minister under president Boris Yeltsin, was assassinated within eyesight of the Kremlin by trained killers of the Russian secret service.

According to The Sydney Morning Herald of January 23, elite Russians continue to perish under mysterious circumstances. The trail of bloodshed and violent deaths has spanned time zones and continents. Thirty-two prominent Russians have perished mysteriously since the war in Ukraine began, and the scope and depth of their deaths is truly frightening.

The message seems to be clear: oppose the Kremlin and your life will be snuffed out, no matter which part of the world you live in. In today’s Russia there is no alternative to Vladimir Putin, and there is no room for dissent.

Farouk Araie
Gauteng

JOIN THE DISCUSSION: Send us an email with your comments to letters@businesslive.co.za. Letters of more than 300 words will be edited for length. Anonymous correspondence will not be published. Writers should include a daytime telephone number.

subscribe Support our award-winning journalism. The Premium package (digital only) is R30 for the first month and thereafter you pay R129 p/m now ad-free for all subscribers.
Subscribe now

Would you like to comment on this article?
Sign up (it's quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.