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Minister in the presidency Khumbudzo Ntshavheni. Picture: FREDDY MAVUNDA
Minister in the presidency Khumbudzo Ntshavheni. Picture: FREDDY MAVUNDA

There have been angry responses to the reckless statements made recently by minister in the presidency Khumbudzo Ntshavheni claiming the private sector has been trying for years to collapse the government (“Private sector is ‘engineering the collapse’ of government, says Ntshavheni”, November 20).

Rather than the president correcting her, which he did, he should have fired her. However, her rants fit with the ANC government’s repeated claims these days that little or none of the mess state-owned enterprises such as Eskom and Transnet find themselves in, or the incompetence and bankruptcy of countless municipalities, rampant corruption and crime, the poor state of our public education and health facilities, surging national debt, potholes, or anything else, is their doing.

They consistently protest that these problems are because of other reasons or are legacies of apartheid. There are unquestionably problematic legacies of the apartheid years, but surely the ANC government must acknowledge that in the three decades it has governed it hasn’t adequately addressed them, and that it has ruined so much.

The economies of various countries in Africa north of us are forging ahead. Tanzania, which has risen from extreme poverty to now being one of the top 10 economies in Africa, provides an interesting lesson. Some years ago its government decided to stop moaning about the past and blaming the colonial era for its dire circumstances. It ditched the rearview mirror and decided to look ahead and take firm responsibility for the country’s fortunes.

It was a courageous step, and the foresight and decisiveness of Tanzania’s leaders have yielded amazing results. SA will continue to meander in the morass we are in until the ANC government does the same and stops blaming everyone else and the past for our woes. It must accept that having political power requires accountability and acceptance of formidable responsibility. 

Trevor Munday
Via email

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