Proteas spin ace Tabraiz Shamsi is loving the spin options the South Africans can now bring to T20 internationals. Picture: GALLO IMAGES/ISURU SAMEERA
Proteas spin ace Tabraiz Shamsi is loving the spin options the South Africans can now bring to T20 internationals. Picture: GALLO IMAGES/ISURU SAMEERA

In response to Joe Griffith, SA’s glory days may indeed be over, but not because of any racial quota policy (“SA cricket’s glory days are over”, October 5).

Maladministration, corruption and poor commercial judgment in which the interest of administrators is placed ahead of the interests of the game has lead to a flight of sponsors, a breakdown in relations with international cricketing bodies and diminishing crowd support.

Add to that a cycle in which Hashim Amla, Jacques Kallis, Graeme Smith, AB de Villiers and others all retired within a short time of each other, and you have a talent deficit compared to rival teams. The race quota selection policy may be an imposition, but it cannot be a major cause of the decline in our cricket. Black players chosen to represent SA have generally performed with distinction.

Take Kagiso Rabada and Tabraiz Shamsi for example. Regarding Temba Bavuma, anyone who saw his century against England at Newlands could only be impressed with his talent and attitude. He has fallen off a bit since then, but that is a normal pattern. He will recover. If he is not worth investing in, then who is?

Statistics can be used to support whichever argument you wish. Bavuma’s Test batting average is now 32, England’s Ben Stokes’s Test batting average is 37 (not quite the 45 mentioned). Bavuma’s one day batting average is 49.9, Stokes’ is 40. Bavuma’s 20/20 average is 27.3, Stokes’ is 20. Go figure.

Malcolm Keevy
Via email

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