A natural gas power generating plant is shown in Huntington Beach, California on June 24 2021. Picture: REUTERS/MIKE BLAKE
A natural gas power generating plant is shown in Huntington Beach, California on June 24 2021. Picture: REUTERS/MIKE BLAKE

Terry Crawford-Browne quotes the Israeli department of foreign affairs acknowledging that “Israel has suffered from a chronic water shortage for years” (“Israel is no example when it comes to water”, July 30).

This is true, but as usual Crawford-Browne left out one important detail: the report, from Israel’s Water Commission, is dated 1998 and related to Israel’s water law of 1959 and agricultural use in 1975.

Since then the problems raised in the years preceding 1998 have been resolved by building five desalination plants, with a sixth about to be added. Israel supplies the Palestinians with about twice the amount required under the Oslo Accord, and under an agreement dated July 2021 Israel will be doubling its supply of fresh water to water-starved Jordan. I doubt Jordan would willingly continue to use and even increase its use of Israeli water if it was as poisonous as described by Browne.

Israel built one of the world’s biggest desalination plants in dry Southern California. I live in Israel and drink desalinated water daily. I am sorry to disappoint Browne, but I am both alive and healthy. It may be a bitter pill for him to swallow, but Israel really is the world’s leader in desalination for fresh, high-quality and safe drinking water.

Charles M Abelsohn
Kfar Sava, Israel

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