Eskom's Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town. Picture: SUNDAY TIMES
Eskom's Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town. Picture: SUNDAY TIMES

The world is rightly concerned about the price we pay for economic development in terms of solid and gaseous waste and their effects on our quality of life and climate change.

Keith Gottschalk is concerned about 1,000 tonnes of nuclear waste at Koeberg, and so he should be (“How can we think about more nuclear power when state cannot manage what we have?”, March 1). However, as with all things a sense of proportion is required.

The UK, for example, thinks it will generate 50-million tonnes of nuclear waste in the next 100 years. Unfortunately, it already generates the same amount of hazardous waste from domestic and industrial waste every year. Readers interested in sorting fact from fiction about nuclear power might try www. world-nuclear.org.

An executive from a European carmaker that is going all electric was asked recently what the world should do about the millions of discarded car batteries that will soon litter the planet. He agreed that nobody has addressed that problem yet, but thought they “might be useful around the house”.

Sometimes we must be careful what we wish for. It might be a wind turbine in every street and a pile of batteries in the garden.

Bernard Benson, Parklands

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Eskom's Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town. Picture: SUNDAY TIMES
Eskom's Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town. Picture: SUNDAY TIMES

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