Public Servants Association members demand higher wages during a march in Johannesburg. Picture: SIMPHIWE NKWALI
Public Servants Association members demand higher wages during a march in Johannesburg. Picture: SIMPHIWE NKWALI

The fear within government circles is obviously that the Constitutional Court will look beyond the mere technicality used by the Labour Appeal Court when rejecting the wage agreement between public servants and the government (“Tito Mboweni commits to bailing out provinces should wage risk materialise”, February 4).

The government negotiators seem to have been entering into an agreement with their fingers crossed. This entire episode is disgusting for many reasons. First, government was fully aware when it first signed the agreement that it could not afford the increases.

Second, the negotiating team must have been given permission to enter into the agreement despite the unaffordability, which could not have escaped their legal advisers.

Third, the agreement was designed to ensure the public servants carried on voting for the governing party. All of the above would in any normal democracy lead to the resignation of all the ministers involved.

Michael Bagraim, MP
DA shadow deputy employment & labour minister

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