Residents of the Bekezela informal settlement queue to receive donated food. Picture: EMMANUEL CROSET / AFP
Residents of the Bekezela informal settlement queue to receive donated food. Picture: EMMANUEL CROSET / AFP

So Chris Dunn undertook a mysteriously “arduous” aeroplane trip from the UK to Cape Town in 1983 and went on to be given “the keys to a future” in SA, where he remains to this day (“Spur’s fizzling sizzle is a tragedy”, July 29).

He writes with deep nostalgia of the period — without once referring to the fact that he, merely through his experience at a “fish ’n chip chain in the UK” (and being white) was afforded opportunities, a career and a lifestyle that were denied to black South Africans.

Meanwhile, the people of SA were rising up, and being viciously put down by the apartheid government, the United Democratic Front was founded, bombs were going off, the “border war” was continuing, and the tricameral parliament was invented to hold the black majority at bay.

Do Dunn and Business Day’s mainly white male correspondents, who often seem to yearn for these pre-1994 years, ever consider that they gained their advantageous positions in life just because they were white, and that this accounts, at least in part, for the parlous condition of most South Africans today?

Ruth Muller
Northlands

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