The shooting at Sharpeville in 1960, when police opened fire on anti-pass demonstrators in the Vaal Triangle. Picture: SUPPLIED
The shooting at Sharpeville in 1960, when police opened fire on anti-pass demonstrators in the Vaal Triangle. Picture: SUPPLIED

With so much happening in the country due to the Covid-19 pandemic and slump in the economy, which has once more plunged SA into recession, it is easy to forget that March is one of the most important months in the SA democratic calendar.

This is the month in which the country commemorates and honours those who fought for liberation and equal rights for all citizens. The systematic defiance and protests against apartheid and racism across the country, which culminated in the senseless killing of 69 protesters in Sharpeville and other townships such as Langa, will always serve as a reminder that the rights we enjoy today came at a very high price.

The current generation enjoys many of those rights, which are entrenched in the constitution, such as equality, human dignity, freedom of movement and residence, language, culture and life. However, one cannot say they truly enjoy these rights when the burning issue of land reform is yet to be convincingly addressed.

SA’s land ownership pattern is a far cry from the equality and freedom of movement and residence that the constitution preaches.

Jabulani Malinga, Via e-mail

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