President Cyril Ramaphosa addresses the residents of Pampierstad in the Northern Cape ahead of the ANC 108 birthday celebrations. Picture: MASI LOSI
President Cyril Ramaphosa addresses the residents of Pampierstad in the Northern Cape ahead of the ANC 108 birthday celebrations. Picture: MASI LOSI

It beggars belief that President Cyril Ramaphosa described the ANC as a “great and glorious” movement this weekend. This movement has led our country to its state of virtual collapse, yet the president and his cabinet colleagues try to convince us that they have everything under control and the good life is just round the corner.

The reality, as Carol Paton pointed out in her column, is that the ANC is unable to govern the country or reform itself (“SA’s 2020 crystal ball offers clear vision of hope and gloom”, January 7). She rightly calls for a new form of politics and an overhaul of our political establishment.

Our ANC-dominated parliament is a farce, populated by far too many uncouth, incompetent, weak individuals, many of whom — mostly from the ranks of the EFF and ANC — should be facing charges for fraud, corruption, misleading parliament, nepotism, looting and other crimes.

The government is supposed to advance the wellbeing of the country’s citizens, not deprive them of electricity, water, housing, employment, personal safety, travel opportunities, health care and education by kowtowing to the trade unions or through the reckless mismanagement of the massive financial resources placed in their hands by taxpaying citizens.

We need a government that deals with all our national crises, not just Eskom, as a matter of urgency. The president cannot do this alone, yet his ministers of finance and public enterprises are under constant attack by their own party. 

If only Ramaphosa would stop fooling himself about unity within the ANC, he could enter into a power-sharing agreement with opposition parties and form a new cabinet from the best individuals available from across the political, business and civil society spectrums that could take dramatic, decisive and immediate action without fear or favour. The nation would mobilise behind him.

David Gant
Kenilworth

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