People protest outside the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom during a hearing on Prime Minister Boris Johnson's decision to prorogue parliament, in London, Britain September 17, 2019. Picture: REUTERS / PHIL NOBLE
People protest outside the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom during a hearing on Prime Minister Boris Johnson's decision to prorogue parliament, in London, Britain September 17, 2019. Picture: REUTERS / PHIL NOBLE

In your editorial opinion of September 16 about the Brexit saga you omitted to mention a very important aspect of the conflict taking place in the UK parliament (“Dogma overrides British common sense”, September 16).

In the 2016 referendum a majority voted to exit the EU, and parliament voted in 2018 to leave on a date finally postponed to October 31. And it seems that a majority still wish to exit.

The government led by Boris Johnson has recently been reduced to a minority by defections from his own party, and the combined majority (the Remainers) have been doing everything, taking every technical point they can, to thwart Johnson’s intention to leave the union on October 31, including passing laws to prevent him from doing so.

Johnson believes strongly that a great majority of the British public wish to leave the EU and he has repeatedly offered to hold a general election before October 31. But he cannot do so without something like a two-thirds majority in parliament, or a vote of no confidence in himself being passed by parliament.

The Remainers in parliament know full well that in such an election the Conservatives under Johnson will probably obtain an absolute majority. So they sit in parliament stubbornly trying to frustrate the will of the British people, which they know is to leave the EU. How’s that for democracy?

John Price
Via e-mail