AUGUST 7, 2019. Almost a week after the Joburg CBD erupted into chaos, the police stepped up the pressure and continued with raids, confiscating goods from alleged illegal traders. Picture: ALON SKUY
AUGUST 7, 2019. Almost a week after the Joburg CBD erupted into chaos, the police stepped up the pressure and continued with raids, confiscating goods from alleged illegal traders. Picture: ALON SKUY

South Africans will one day wake up to a coup d’état by foreign forces, either through the barrel of the gun or economic seizure.

The discovery of hidden unlicensed weapons and ammunition, along with tons of counterfeit goods, when police recently raided Johannesburg central, all point to a country under siege.  The guns that were found included six rifles of the kind used in warfare or law enforcement.

The situation in Johannesburg is the tip of an iceberg. Last year, we saw a number of well co-ordinated violent attacks and murders at sques in the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. Foreign nationals have been linked to these attacks.

The SA Revenue Service estimates the value of counterfeit goods coming through our borders at more than R1bn a year. Proceeds from this illegal activity fuel the drug trade and pushed up property prices in prime areas of the country. 

Foreign nationals also have business ventures in SA that make them significant players in the generation of SA’s GDP, meaning economic colonisation is afoot. We come from a history of land dispossession due to decades of colonisation and apartheid, and our people cannot afford the new form of dispossession under the democratic dispensation.

Foreigners, regardless of country of origin, must only be allowed to lease land. No foreign national must be allowed to own land in our country. There must be strict regulation of foreign nationals in the informal economy as well, so their businesses are also subjected to taxation.

Many countries are increasingly banning foreigners from owning properties to protect their sovereignty. After a housing affordability crisis New Zealand passed legislation prohibiting foreigners from owning property. Foreigners also cannot own property in Thailand, among several other countries in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and South America.

Vuyolwethu Zungula, MP
President, African Transformation Movement