Former President Jacob Zuma sings with supporters after his appearance in the High Court where he faces charges that include fraud, corruption and racketeering. Picture: REUTERS/ROGAN WARD
Former President Jacob Zuma sings with supporters after his appearance in the High Court where he faces charges that include fraud, corruption and racketeering. Picture: REUTERS/ROGAN WARD

Judge Jerome Mnguni is due to deliver in August his ruling on Jacob Zuma’s bid to halt his prosecution for alleged corruption emanating from the arms deal.

Why such a long delay? Two months is unreasonable given that Zuma’s name is mentioned in relation to corruption almost every day, the most recent being the Public Investment Corporation’s R4bn deal with an abstruse oil company.

It is understandable that any judge hearing a matter relating to criminal activity would have to apply their mind to the facts, and to the law relating to the case in question. However, two months to frame a judgment is inordinately long given that allegations against the former president have endured for so many years.

Furthermore, taking into account that Zuma has complained that the matter has dragged on for more than a decade, and that he has in the past expressed his wish to have his day in court, some alacrity is needed.

New prosecutions head Shamila Batohi has her work cut out. Surely, it is not too much to ask the judiciary to expedite cases in the interests of justice?

Nathan Cheiman
Northcliff