Cyril Ramaphosa dances on stage after delivering a speech outside Lithuli House in Johannesburg, May 12 2019. Picture: WIKUS DE WET / AFP
Cyril Ramaphosa dances on stage after delivering a speech outside Lithuli House in Johannesburg, May 12 2019. Picture: WIKUS DE WET / AFP

The first hurdle for President Cyril Ramaphosa were the elections. He sailed over relatively comfortably. Now the second hurdle awaits him,,ridding the top-heavy cabinet of corrupt and incompetent ministers, replacing them with a smaller team with the right credentials for specific portfolios and, as promised, doing away with deputy ministers.

The third challenge is allowing the National Prosecuting Authority, together with the Hawks, to go after the serious offenders in terms of corruption and state capture, with immediate effect. Commissions of inquiry have identified the culprits, so it’s now up to the law enforcement authorities to act decisively .

The opposition parties, on the other hand, have their own hurdles overcome,  such as the in-fighting that has dented their credibility. Another is the habit of lashing out at the government with worthless rhetoric, instead of presenting solutions. High-pitched evangelistic fire-and-brimstone sermonising gets no converts.

In an ideal world, our parliament would be more bipartisan, with all parties, after rational debate agreeing on policies that benefit the nation at large. Given our diverse and complex population, this is the government needed — almost a government of national unity. An insurmountable hurdle?

Cliff Buchler
George