An anti-Brexit demonstrator holds placards during pro and anti-Brexit protests outside the Houses of Parliament in London, UK, in this file photograph. Photographer: LUKE MACGREGOR/BLOOMBERG
An anti-Brexit demonstrator holds placards during pro and anti-Brexit protests outside the Houses of Parliament in London, UK, in this file photograph. Photographer: LUKE MACGREGOR/BLOOMBERG

Columnist Steven Friedman is, of course, absolutely right (“ANC will keep majority because the poor support the policies that serve them”, March 27).

The two most striking instances of this truth are the election of President Donald Trump in the US, and the British referendum vote to leave the EU.

In both cases, a comfortable ruling middle class, backed by the media and like-minded academia, has been astonished and outraged by outcomes that flew in the face of its confident expectations.

In both cases the fury is yet unabated, with the Democratic Party in Washington determined by hook or by crook to topple Trump, and in the UK, legislators doing their utmost to wriggle out of a democratic decision they disagree with.

In SA, the public narrative of the next election is overwhelmingly being conducted in liberal terms. However, most voters “lead lives of quiet desperation” (by Thoreau’s definition), and will, I suspect, take little notice of the commissions of inquiry and headline exposure of ANC malfeasance and corruption.

Richard McNeill
Noordhoek