Anti-Brexit activists hold placards as they demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament in London on March 14, 2019 as MPs debate a motion on whether to seek a delay to Britain's exit from the EU. MPs vote on March 14 on whether to seek a Brexit delay. Pic: AFP/TOLGA AKMEN
Anti-Brexit activists hold placards as they demonstrate outside the Houses of Parliament in London on March 14, 2019 as MPs debate a motion on whether to seek a delay to Britain's exit from the EU. MPs vote on March 14 on whether to seek a Brexit delay. Pic: AFP/TOLGA AKMEN

While the House of Commons destroys the UK’s hard-won political stability with its multiple Brexit votes, the end is nigh. Europe cannot allow this fiasco to continue for a moment longer than March 29.

Divisive elections are due in May, the EU economy is collectively approaching recession, the euro is in deep trouble, the European banking system is decidedly unstable and social unrest is still ongoing in France. Quite apart from the legal implications of an extension, the EU must stop the Westminster saga and focus on these challenges. If it cannot act decisively on Brexit now, then it has little hope of withstanding the perfect storm that’s heading straight at it.

The House of Commons will probably vote for Theresa May to request an extension to the UK’s departure date. But the answer from Brussels will be as follows. “The deal is on the table. Either you take it, as is, or leave on March 29.”  

The option of the UK collectively  grovelling and pleading to stay after all have left the room. The French have already begun practical preparations for a de facto hard Brexit and we must try to understand what the implications will be for SA.

James Cunningham
Camps Bay