subscribe Support our award-winning journalism. The Premium package (digital only) is R30 for the first month and thereafter you pay R129 p/m now ad-free for all subscribers.
Subscribe now
Former president and MK party leader Jacob Zuma Picture: SANDILE NDLOVU
Former president and MK party leader Jacob Zuma Picture: SANDILE NDLOVU

Former president Jacob Zuma’s complaints about the greed manifesting itself in his uMkhonto weSizwe Party (MK) are so rich in irony. 

For someone who opened the floodgates of greed and corruption which have infested the body politic and led to the looting of billions of rand from the state and state-owned entities to now complain about the same tendency in his party also reeks of double standards. 

MK was created around the cult and personality of one man, Zuma, in his drive to wreak vengeance against the ruling ANC. Its leaders and members are not bound by a common set of principles and policies but by a drive for power, position and privilege. In this context allegiance is sold to the highest bidder. 

Party founder Jabulani Khumalo and four other members were expelled from the party last month on suspicion that they were working with external forces to destabilise the party. Khumalo was alleged to have received bribes and cars from the ANC. 

The party has been wracked by division leading Zuma to complain on the weekend about the disunity tearing apart his party. 

Zuma also said this greed over positions made him “sick”. If only the capture of the state by his Gupta associates had engendered a similar feeling rather than to the disempowering of the institutions that could have held them accountable. 

The support that MK has gathered in KwaZulu-Natal and which various polls have attested to is support for Zuma himself, so the disunity and greed that he complains about is unlikely to affect its election outcome. 

subscribe Support our award-winning journalism. The Premium package (digital only) is R30 for the first month and thereafter you pay R129 p/m now ad-free for all subscribers.
Subscribe now

Would you like to comment on this article?
Sign up (it's quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.