The World Bank’s prediction that SA’s GDP could contract by as much as 8% in 2020 came just after the UN suggested Africa could lose up to half of all its jobs because of Covid-19. And then the World Trade Organisation really scared us, talking about global trade falling by as much as a third. Inevitably, the IMF weighed in with its own bit of well-researched woe, warning us last week that the world faced its steepest economic decline since the Great Depression. (https://webmail.timesmedia.co.za/owa/redir.aspx?REF=NS4iM29avt3q1ihFsx3XcIHSkVhvQJKlysFtWVlMlOHbuLOqquLXCAFodHRwczovL3d3dy5idXNpbmVzc2xpdmUuY28uemEvYmQvd29ybGQvMjAyMC0wNC0xNC1pbWYtd2FybnMtZ2xvYmFsLWVjb25vbXktdG8tc3VmZmVyLXN0ZWVwZXN0LWRlY2xpbmUtc2luY2UtZ3JlYXQtZGVwcmVzc2lvbi8.)

Things are going to get bad, and it will be a long time before they ever get better again. Across Sub-Saharan Africa, capitalism as we know it will almost certainly never be the same again. And in poor old unequal, stagnant, mismanaged SA, witho...

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