Energy cannot be created or destroyed, but only transferred from one form to another. In today’s energy landscape, that statement has many permutations given the changing shift from fossil fuels to natural gas and renewables. The accelerated drop in the price of technology, coupled with a tectonic shift in the political will of countries and global organisations, has created a momentum never before seen in such a short space of time. There is a temptation to fantasise about solar-powered roadways and natural gas-powered vehicles, but the path to the reduction of carbon emissions and climate stability is not linear. It is rather a windy road paved with obstacles, some unintended others placed there deliberately. For example, in some regions historical investments in fossil fueled plants means their ability to reduce carbon emissions is hamstrung by their need to get a return from their investment in coal plants, to ensure it is operated efficiently to “sweat the asset”. By inference,...

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