It "is not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change", said Charles Darwin, the English naturalist, geologist and biologist best known for his contributions to the science of evolution to explain change. As we entrench democratic values and make changes to tackle SA’s triple challenge of poverty, inequality and unemployment, we will always have to get past the charlatans and the naysayers, analysts and political scientists who are reluctant to recognise initiatives that are slowly improving people’s lives. We are not opposed to criticism. We welcome views such as the one expressed by academic and former public servant Gusha Xolani Ngantweni (Eastern Cape needs urgent help, March 24), who concludes that the province has failed. Undoing the past to defeat poverty, inequality and unemployment is not easy. Of all apartheid’s legacies, the network of so-called independent homelands inside SA’s borders has proved one of the most difficult...

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