Six-year-old learner Bukho Gadeni starts his day at St Mary’s Primary School in Gardens, Cape Town, where education minister Debbie Schäfer was visiting the to welcome learners arriving for the first day of the 2020 school year on January 15, 2019. Picture: SUNDAY TIMES/ESA ALEXANDER
Six-year-old learner Bukho Gadeni starts his day at St Mary’s Primary School in Gardens, Cape Town, where education minister Debbie Schäfer was visiting the to welcome learners arriving for the first day of the 2020 school year on January 15, 2019. Picture: SUNDAY TIMES/ESA ALEXANDER

The Gauteng department of education is partnering with private school group Curro to take on late registrations for 2020. 

The department says it has also done everything possible to ensure a smooth start to the first day of school on Wednesday. “To mitigate to capacity challenges, we are, administratively, finalising a partnership with Curro to accommodate our children at their schools,” the department announced. 

Late registrations are being looked at in terms of the fee structure of Curro schools, compared to that of public schools, and would involve a discounted fee, according to a statement from the department. “We are indebted to Curro for the willingness to assist. We are also interacting with other private schools to assist us.”

As the new school year begins, we take a deeper look at the matric pass rate and its importance. The matric pass rate for 2019 exceeded 80% for the first time since 1994, but some academics argue that this figure does not reflect the true health of the education system, due to the high dropout rate. Others suggest that the country's focus on the matric pass rate is problematic in itself.

Serious capacity challenges, the department said, are being experienced in the educational districts of Tshwane west, Tshwane south, Johannesburg central, Johannesburg east, Johannesburg north and Ekurhuleni south.

“As such, we are finalising the process of providing temporary accommodation in the form of mobile units at some affected schools as a matter of urgency. This will also be extended to some schools that were vandalised or burnt by the community.

“As another method of intervention, we had to negotiate with some schools to increase their capacity to accommodate more learners and such schools will be prioritised in provisioning of mobile units.”

Would you like to comment on this article or view other readers' comments?
Register (it’s quick and free) or sign in now.

Speech Bubbles

Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.