Cyril Ramaphosa shows his gratitude after being elected by MPs as president of South Africa during the first sitting of the National Assembly on May 22 2019 at Parliament in Cape Town, Picture: GCIS
Cyril Ramaphosa shows his gratitude after being elected by MPs as president of South Africa during the first sitting of the National Assembly on May 22 2019 at Parliament in Cape Town, Picture: GCIS

Cyril Ramaphosa has been elected president of SA at the first sitting of the National Assembly held on Wednesday. 

This comes after ANC deputy president David Mabuza took the decision to postpone his swearing-in, following the integrity commission's report naming him as one of those who had possibly brought the party into disrepute. 

As expected, senior ANC MP Thandi Modise was elected as speaker of the National Assembly, the highest position in the legislature. Lechesa Tsenoli was elected deputy speaker, for a second term. 

Nomvula Mokonyane, environmental affairs minister in the last administration, was not sworn in, with the ANC confirming that she had decided to withdraw from parliament. This comes after Malusi Gigaba and former speaker Baleka Mbete withdrew their names from the ANC’s parliamentary list on Tuesday.

Mokonyane was also on the list of people the integrity commission reportedly named.

With the ANC's new top 10 set to be sworn in on May 22 2019, we decided to take a look at the current top 10 and its most controversial figures.

MPs who served as Cabinet ministers in the previous administration and who believe they will not be re-appointed have an interest in resigning before the new executive is appointed as this enables them to hold onto their ministerial pension, which is substantially higher than an MP’s salary. 

Another ANC MP who has been named in ethical or possible legal transgressions — Bathabile Dlamini — did not withdraw and was sworn in, along with erstwhile ministers Mosebenzi Zwane and Faith Muthambi, both of whom have been implicated in allegations of state capture.

Finance minister Tito Mboweni, who arrived an hour late for the ceremony, had fellow MPs speculating on whether he had changed his mind about returning to parliament. Mboweni is well-known for his habit of “late to bed and late to rise” and has publicly complained about the number of early morning appointments as finance minister.

quintalg@businesslive.co.za
patonc@businesslive.co.za